Parks

BELL ACRES BOROUGH PARK
Located at the corner of Big Sewickley Creek & Hitzel Hill roads.
Open sunrise to sunset.

This recreational park features 3 play areas, 2 basketball courts, a sand volleyball court & a large paved area for bike riding, skating, etc. The shelter is available on a first come basis. No permit is needed. Motorized vehicles, open fires & alcohol are prohibited. At the edge of the park stands the Bell Acres Honor Roll for WWII military veterans.

 

 

BELL ACRES NATURE PARK
The park is open from sunrise to sunset with the trail entrance located at the intersection of Sevin and Turkeyfoot roads. There are no facilities.

This heavily wooded 200+ acre greenspace surrounds Turkeyfoot Run and is part of the Big Sewickley Creek watershed. Allegheny County’s Natural Heritage Inventory includes the park in the Camp Meeting Woods Biological Diversity Area, which is exceptionally significant for its wide variety of trees, plants and wildlife.
        105 acres of the park are on the western side of Turkeyfoot Road. Bisected by Sevin Road, this tract was once Camp Umbstaetter, a popular boy scout camp in the 1920s and 30s. Scattered remnants of camp structures may still be found throughout the site. Ambridge’s Greek American Progressive Association later purchased the property for recreational use.
        In 1995-96, the 105-acre tract along with an additional 98 acres on the eastern side of Turkeyfoot Road was transferred to Bell Acres Borough by the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy on condition the land remain in its natural state and never be developed. A half mile trail extends eastward into the park from the intersection of Sevin and Turkeyfoot roads. Adjoining the park’s eastern edge is the Allegheny Land Trust’s 36 acre Beadnell Slope Conservation Area.
        Through the combined efforts of Bell Acres Borough, the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy, the Allegheny Land Trust, the Big and Little Sewickley Creek Watershed associations and countless volunteers, much of the borough’s woodlands and waterways will remain “forever wild”.